2017 Sessions

SUMMIT SESSION SCHEDULE

Wednesday, May 24

10:15 – 11:30 AM – Session 1

FROM IDEAS TO ACTION: Fewer Meetings, More Action - Community Outreach Through Tangible Projects

ROOM – Greene/Franklin

Hilltop Alliance and Bloomfield Development Corporation have implemented projects and programs that achieve multiple goals: community engagement, consensus building, and neighborhood improvement. These unconventional outreach tools – a streetscape demonstration project and a property stabilization program – have enabled the organizations to conduct proactive outreach and expand efforts with assistance from Neighborhood Allies. This session will talk about the goals and results of each program as well as ways that similar initiatives can be implemented in other communities.

Format: Seminar and Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Christina Howll: Executive Director, Bloomfield Development Corporation
  • Tim Dolan: Program Director, Hilltop Alliance
  • Lauren Hinish: Director of Arts, Propel Schools
  • Jennifer Cristobal: Planner, Michael Baker International
  • Shad Henderson: Director of Community Partnerships and Investments, Neighborhood Allies

Presentation

ORGANIZING ACROSS BOUNDARIES: Activating Citizen Philanthropy for Healthy Neighborhoods

ROOM – Sky

Citizen Philanthropy is activated through high-touch, high-return outreach strategies that recruit donors to their neighbors’ ideas. It can generate great impact and a community invested beyond volunteering – local and national data show that communities of all income levels already give consistently. Directing citizen philanthropy to community projects focuses investment in the powerful good ideas of our own neighbors. Steering citizen philanthropy across neighborhood borders widens investment in place-based, resident-driven projects through which residents become citizen leaders. This interactive session will share data and best practices in activating citizen philanthropy. Attendees will gain insight and know-how through very brief presentations followed by a workshop using case studies that include ioby’s nationwide work and Kiva Pittsburgh.

Format: Workshop

Presenters:

  • Emily Keebler: Program Director, KIVA Pittsburgh
  • Miriam Parson: Action Strategist, ioby Pittsburgh
  • Karris M. Jackson: Vice President of Programs, POISE Foundation

Presentation

PUBLIC SECTOR PARTNERSHIPS: Bridging the Divide Between Neighborhoods and Developers

ROOM – Allegheny

Consumer understanding of regulatory barriers to building affordable housing is limited. Meanwhile new developments are more often subject to intense scrutiny as communities work to balance the needs of new and existing residents. New projects face special challenges as demands from community leaders for affordable, accessible and mixed-income housing developments rise. Communities expect more and, given the opportunity, will provide input through a formal process. However if the opportunity for a formal process is not present, the community will provide input informally through social media or by reaching out to public officials. This exercise provides the key building blocks for creating a meaningful community participation plan with a fair housing lens, to address concerns of the community, communicate the realities of development, and help improve relations and communications between housing providers and stakeholders.

Format: Seminar and Workshop

Presenters:

  • Eric Sloss: Creative Strategist and Principal Partner, Shift Collaborative
  • Sarah Kinter: Deputy Director, City of Pittsburgh Commission on Human Relations
  • Claire L. Hosteny: East End Development Partner, Ace Hotel
  • Nathan Cunningham: East End Development Partner, Ace Hotel

Presentation

ADVANCING EQUITABLE DEVELOPMENT: Overcoming Persistent Neighborhood Challenges in Pittsburgh

ROOM – Monongahela

Pittsburgh has made great strides in restructuring and streamlining departments and operations, improving technology and providing data, and diversifying talent to transparently implement sweeping systemic changes. Persistent challenges to improving the quality of life for all remain, however. With a strong foundation now in place, now is the time for community activists to join city partners in proposing creative solutions to these challenges. Hear and engage with three groups focused on the following areas:

1. Zoning Code: Examining ways to strengthen language to better protect residential neighborhoods. Vagueness allows for risks to residents and irresponsible development.
2. Enforcement: Examining Quality of Life ticketing and other ways to strengthen enforcement of issues like trash, blight, abandonment and overcrowding.
3. Procedural: Examining our city’s current design review process and exploring ways to support community members’ participation in conjunction with the Registered Community Organization process underway at City Planning.

Format: Seminar and Workshop

Presenters:

  • Julie Reiland: Government and Public Relations Liaison, Pittsburgh Department of Permits, Licenses, and Inspections
  • Stafani Danes: Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture
  • Carol Kowall: Coalition of Oakland Residents
  • Barbara Rudiak: President, Southside Community Council
  • Elena Zaitsoff: Co-Chair, Oakwatch
  • Corey Layman: Zoning Administrator, Pittsburgh Department of City Planning

Presentation

1:00 – 2:15 PM – Session 2

FROM IDEAS TO ACTION: Collaboration - The New Competition

ROOM – Sky

Research to identify ways to eliminate poverty in our communities has shown that collaboration between community change-makers, citizens, and economic actors must occur to make a difference for our most vulnerable. This session highlights two models which blur the lines between the traditional separation of social service programs. Focus On Renewal and McKees Rocks Community Development Corporation brought together 40+ partners to respond to systemic challenges surrounding Mental Health Care in their community. Over the course of a year, the Sto-Rox Mental Health Providers Network met in action teams to form and open the Sto-Rox Community Resource Center. Family Services of Western Pennsylvania’s Ways to Work Program is a national best practice to connect social services with lending institutions and car dealerships. Ways to Work empowers people with poor credit to obtain low-interest car loans so they can purchase reliable transportation, increasing their ability to access employment.

Format: Seminar and Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Taris Vrck: Executive Director, McKees Rocks Community Development Corporation
  • Gwen Porter: Family Services of Western Pennsylvania
  • Joe Dello Stritto: Family Services of Western Pennsylvania
  • Lydia Morin: Director of Community Engagement and Enterprise, Focus on Renewal Sto-Rox
  • Cynthia Haines: Executive Director, Focus on Renewal Sto-Rox

Presentation

ORGANIZING ACROSS BOUNDARIES: Using the Community Reinvestment and Fair Housing Acts to Create Integrated, Beloved Communities with Access to Opportunity

ROOM – Allegheny

The Community Reinvestment Act creates an affirmative obligation for banks to invest in low to moderate income communities.  The Fair Housing Act’s Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing rule creates a process called the Assessment of Fair Housing which gives every community member and advocate a seat at the community planning table with local and state governments.  This process is designed to drive resources into segregated or poor communities, but falls short of creating lasting change without local banks also keeping their affirmative obligation.  Combining Community Reinvestment Act coalitions and Community Benefit Agreement investments into the Assessment of Fair Housing process allows for incredible public and private partnerships and innovation.  Participants will learn how Community Reinvestment Act and Assessment of Fair Housing coalitions develop and operate to link affordable housing to quality transportation, employment, education, access to credit, a clean environment, fresh food and water, and relief from criminal justice abuses.

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Kevin Hill: Community Reinvestment Coordinator, National Community Reinvestment Coalition
  • Kristina Musante: Director of the National Training Academy, National Community Reinvestment Coalition

Presentation

PUBLIC SECTOR PARTNERSHIPS: Using Zoning Ordinances as Tools for Community Preservation and Economic Development

ROOM – Franklin/Greene

Municipal Ordinances are often viewed as arcane, bureaucratic legal requirements which lack creativity. However, old tools for zoning are being used in new ways to foster pedestrian scale development, preserve and enhance community assets, and encourage reinvestment. Focusing on smaller cities, municipalities, and townships in the Pittsburgh region, this panel discussion will examine some of these new approaches, from overlay zoning districts for business corridors and riverfront preservation, to density bonuses for redevelopment. Perspectives from the municipalities, developers and consultants who develop these ordinances will be given.

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Ryan Jerowski: Assistant Manager, Peters Township
  • Kevic McKeegan: Meyer, Unkovic, & Scott, LLP
  • Andrew Schwartz: Managing Principal, Environmental Planning & Design, LLC
  • Barbara J. Ciampini: Planning Director, City of Greensburg
  • John Trant, Jr.: President, Strategic Solutions, LLC

ADVANCING EQUITABLE DEVELOPMENT: Demand Discovery - Activating Spaces, Developing Places

ROOM – Monongahela

Too often, community members and developers seem like they’re playing for opposing teams. Development is happening to places, not with them. What is more, the level of subsidy being sought for some urban projects, despite the existence of a proven market, is unsustainable for cities. A fundamentally different development model is emerging that proves demand to justify supply rather than subsidizing supply for the hope of attracting demand. A new neighborhood playbook has been developed that enables communities and developers to come together to activate a space (demonstrate demand) on the way to developing a place (building supply). This session describes how it works.

Format: Workshop

Presenters:

  • Joe Nickol: MKSK Studios
  • Kevin Wright: Executive Director, Walnut Hills Redevelopment Foundation

Presentation

2:30 – 3:45 PM – Session 3

FROM IDEAS TO ACTION: Making Neighborhood Plans Work - Job Creation Through Revitalization

ROOM – Sky

Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership’s Building a Better Warren (BABW) program connects the need for true, resident driven community revitalization with job creation, putting residents to work in full time, year round jobs doing the work of blight remediation. The program connects residents with training and employment in renovation, deconstruction, landscape installation, and vacant property maintenance in order to stabilize the city’s vacant and blighted properties, mitigate the impacts of blight, and create home ownership opportunities. Panelists from TNP would discuss the (new) program comprehensively, and present it as a replicable model for other communities.

Format: Seminar

Presenters:

  • Matt Martin: Executive Director, Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership
  • Shawn Carvin: Program Director, Trumbull County Land Bank

Presentation

ORGANIZING ACROSS BOUNDARIES: Building Community Resilience from the Ground UP

ROOM – Monongahela

Resiliency means many things. For Pittsburgh, it’s to thrive in the 21st century as a city of engaged, empowered and coordinated neighbors. Pittsburgh will be resilient when we are livable for all. OnePGH, the City’s resilience framework, establishes a bold vision. Building on a wealth of community assets, OnePGH directly confronts the complex challenges that we all continue to face. The nationally-acclaimed Uptown EcoInnovation District plan—a comprehensive, bottom-up planning process demanding vigorous, inclusive outreach and engagement to generate healthy, sustainable and equitable community development—is OnePGH in practice. Both were created via national partnerships – Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilience Cities Initiative and planning organization EcoDistricts – but were impossible without a collaborative approach to problem identification and solutions development. Presenters will showcase the integration of OnePGH with district scale applications and how the concurrent development of the community-based plan was a formative component of the resilience strategy.

Format: Seminar

Presenters:

  • Derek Dauphin: Sr. Planner of Strategic Planning, City of Pittsburgh
  • Grant Ervin: Chief Resilience Officer, City of Pittsburgh
  • Justin Miller: Principal Transportation Planner, City of Pittsburgh
  • Rebecca Kiernen: Sr. Resilience Coordinator, City of Pittsburgh

Presentation

PUBLIC SECTOR PARTNERSHIPS: The Impact of Funding Housing Rehabilitation in Fairmont, WV

ROOM – Franklin/Greene

Learn how Fairmont-Morgantown Housing Authority and Fairmont Community Development Partnership transformed neighborhoods with owner-occupied rehabilitation in Fairmont WV, population 18,815. Presenters will present virtual neighborhood tours, spotlighting the transformation of homes while outlining the steps taken, challenges overcome, and results achieved. Rye will discuss owner occupied rehabilitation as a scoring priority in FHLBank Pittsburgh’s Affordable Housing Program and provide details on that funding mechanism. Participants will gain understanding how to produce this impact, discuss lessons learned, become aware of funding sources, and discuss their own local housing rehabilitation initiatives.

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Laura Rye: Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh
  • Andrea Salina: Executive Director, Fairmont Community Development Partnership
  • Christal Chrouso: Assistant Director, Fairmont-Morgantown Housing Authority

Presentation

ADVANCING EQUITABLE DEVELOPMENT: Bridging Differences in Access to Capital

ROOM – Allegheny

Banking is heavily regulated and incredibly important, which means the data exist to understand inequities in access to capital. An economist will present findings from Philadelphia and from a 25-city study on home lending, business lending, and branch location disparities. PCRG’s Research Analyst will present findings from the Annual Mortgage Lending Study, and then they will have a discussion about strategies and tactics for bridging differences in access to capital. This will include ways to work with banks to develop products and services that help their bottom line while creating accessible on-ramps for traditionally under-served communities. Participants will learn what the data say about home lending, business lending, and branch location disparities, and what can be done in response that is a win for banks and communities.

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Lee Huang: Sr. Vice President and Principal, Econsult Solutions
  • Alix Levy: Research Analyst, Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group

Presentation

Thursday, May 25

10:15 – 11:30 AM – Session 4

FROM IDEAS TO ACTION: Green Playces - Enabling Youth-Driven Community Development

ROOM – Sky

This session will highlight the Green Playces Initiative from a youth engagement perspective. Attendees will hear directly from students from Holy Family Academy as well as representatives from Youth CAST and the Allentown Learning and Engagement Center. The panel will walk through and discuss our partnership, gaining perspective on how Green Playces positively affects students, as well as some of the real-world issues that come up when dealing with youth programming. The session plans to highlight successes and areas that could be strengthened when engaging youth on community development projects. GTECH’s Green Playces Initiative worked with key youth partners over the past two years which resulted in communities that emphasized creativity and collaboration, while tackling issues such as blight and vacancy. The Initiative reinforced these place-based investments by leveraging community partnerships. This initiative focused on areas that have high concentrations of vacant land and minimal environmental programming for youth. The six completed projects helped to identify and create community green spaces for local service providers. The session will highlight how to work with youth community organizations to foster creativity and address vacancy in their neighborhoods, while creating impactful places to live, work and play.

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Ian Brown: Project Manager, GTECH Strategies
  • Kristen Alvarez: Integrated Studies Teacher, Holy Family Academy
  • Keino Fitzpatrick: Director of Programs, Small Seeds Development, Inc.
  • Maggie Negrete: Education Coordinator, The Brashear Association

Presentation

ORGANIZING ACROSS BOUNDARIES: 100 Day of US - Funding the Community Agenda in Pittsburgh

ROOM – Franklin/Greene

100 Days of US is an initiative to empower people to act locally during the first 100 days of the new presidential administration through positive, solution-oriented responses to issues of national importance. Led by The Sprout Fund, this campaign supported 27 small-scale projects in the Pittsburgh region that demonstrate the community’s values and vision for America. A panel presentation will showcase examples of citizen-led projects and provide a forum for the project leaders to discuss their approach and share what they’ve learned. Program Officer Mac Howison will moderate the discussion and provide perspective on the inspiration, rationale, and strategy that informed the initiative.

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Mac Howison: Program Officer for Catalytic Funding, Sprout Fund
  • Gia Braafhart: New Sun Rising
  • Ashley Chan: of New Voices for Reproductive Justice
  • Elaine Harris-Fulton: Wilkinsburg Family Support Center Parent Council
  • Peyton Klein: Global Minds

Presentation

PUBLIC SECTOR PARTNERSHIPS: The Neighborhood Assistance Program - Driving Community Development Statewide

ROOM – Allegheny

Pennsylvania’s Neighborhood Assistance Program (NAP) offers communities the chance to invest in themselves through smart, targeted initiatives – from building affordable housing to comprehensive revitalization to supporting food banks. Yet, while it’s a pioneering public-private partnership dating back nearly 50 years 60s, NAP hasn’t seen a single increase in its $18 million annual allocation. This interactive panel will share NAP success stories and how you can get involved, so it can come to your community as well. We will explore how NAP allows businesses to be good corporate citizens, targeting charitable giving towards the communities where they work, while enabling community groups to take the lead in helping oft-overlooked neighborhoods and towns thrive once again. Join the movement!

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Tay Waltenbaugh: Executive Director, Westmoreland Community Action
  • Cindy Daley: Regional Housing Legal Services
  • Chris Sandvig: Director of Policy, Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group
  • John Denny: Principal, Denny Civic Solutions

Presentation

ADVANCING EQUITABLE DEVELOPMENT: Who Are We? Identifying Community Values, Building Unity before Development Comes

ROOM Monongahela

The participation of a well-informed and active community is critical to the creation of an achievable vision. However, too often concerns only get a voice in response to a proposed development or specific issue. Division can occur within the community, as small differences become major wedges. This script, however, can be flipped.

This workshop will highlight engagement tools designed to get people talking with each other rather than at each other.  Presenters will highlight how a clear awareness of community identity strengthens all interests in the decision- making processes; the integration of resources with civic visioning programs; and the balancing of past, present and future social values. We will highlight the relationship between placemaking and community identity and ways communities can create their own data to empower each other. We will reinforce this through an activity that helps participants negotiate competing values and identify priorities for establishing a community agenda.

Format: Panel and Workshop

Presenters:

  • Christine Mondor: Principal, evolveEA
  • Rene Cuenca: Community Programs Manager, Design Center of Pittsburgh
  • Chris Koch: Executive Director, Design Center of Pittsburgh
  • Jason Beery: Urbankind Institute

1:45 – 3:00 PM – Session 5

FROM IDEAS TO ACTION: From the White House to the Community - My Brother's Keeper

ROOM – Franklin/Greene

In 2015, Mayor Peduto and County Executive Fitzgerald accepted President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) challenge that focuses on issues facing vulnerable communities and boys and young men of color. The City and County convened a task force of local leaders, crafted a playbook, and enlisted partners actively working on specific objectives within MBK’s six goal areas. Several of these MBK principles were incorporated into the cities Welcoming Pittsburgh framework. In 2016, with support from the Heinz Endowments and the Sprout Fund, the Homewood Children’s Village was contracted to provide program management for MBK and UrbanKind Institute to engage the region’s youth. This session will detail the process and progress made thus far from this innovative county-wide collaboration.

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Josiah Gilliam: Homewood Children’s Village
  • LaTrenda Leonard-Sherrill: The Mayor’s Office
  • Rick Bigelow: Urbankind Institute
  • Ani Martinez: Remake Learning

ORGANIZING ACROSS BOUNDARIES: Creating Win-Win Partnerships with Landlords

ROOM – Sky

As the rental market becomes more competitive and expensive, assistance programs like Housing Choice Vouchers and Rapid Rehousing need to have a pipeline of quality reasonably priced rental housing ready to go. But to create that housing pipeline, there has to be landlords willing to work with programs that not only serve individuals and families with barriers to housing but also come with bureaucratic red tape. The Southwestern PA Housing Alliance Rental Housing Work Group has been engaging small to midsize landlords operating low end rentals to gain their insights into what drives business decisions and develop solutions to make assistance programs more competitive in the private market.

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Gale Schwartz: Coordinator of the Southwestern PA Housing Alliance
  • Anita Zuberi: Assistant Professor in the Sociology Department at Duquesne University, studies poverty, social policy, and community health
  • Chuck Keenan: Administrator in the Bureau of Homeless Services, Allegheny County Department of Human Services

Presentation

PUBLIC SECTOR PARTNERSHIPS: Innovative Funding for Revitalization in Smaller Cities and Towns

ROOM – Allegheny 

The City of Greensburg, Greensburg Salem School District and Westmoreland County have partnered to implement a unique funding mechanism as a component of the downtown revitalization strategy. A new program will temporarily exempt increases in assessed valuation on a commercial building resulting from improvements made to any eligible property within the City. Further, the taxing bodies have cooperated in creation of a special fund established for use in funding priority economic development projects.

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Steve Gifford: Executive Director, Butler County CDC (Formerly Greensburg CDC)
  • Michael Pehur: Development Finance Director, Duane Morris Governmental Strategies

Presentation

ADVANCING EQUITABLE DEVELOPMENT: Creative Conversations - Deliberative Democracy at the Intersection of Arts and Community

ROOM – Monongahela

In 2016, Union Project launched the Creative Conversation Series (CCS), a monthly program that welcomes diverse community members to discuss shared issues and inequality. Two community facilitators (one educator/artist & one civic leader) hold safe space and a local artist documents the conversation with “sketch notes.” Using Deliberative Democracy, attendees create the forum to listen to one another, expand perspectives, exchange ideas and energy, and discover new ways to bridge gaps between communities. In addition to building trust among strangers, CCS has fostered several new arts and social justice programs, and unique partnerships at the intersection of arts and community.

Format: Workshop

Presenters:

  • Jeffrey Dorsey: Union Project
  • Emiola Jay Oriola: University of Pittsburgh

Presentation

3:30 – 4:45 PM – Session 6

FROM IDEAS TO ACTION: Fight Blight Using the Pennsylvania Conservatorship Act

ROOM – Allegheny

The Abandoned and Blighted Property Conservatorship Act is a dynamic tool that can be used by organizations and individuals who are seeking to develop strategies to improve their community. This session will explore the various uses of the statute to improve communities throughout the Commonwealth. Representatives from Philadelphia and Pittsburgh will provide an overview of the effectiveness of the statute; the cost of the litigation; and the strategies that can be employed for a successful conservatorship project. Individuals and organizations seeking to remove blight using conservatorship will benefit from this session, leaving with knowledge of the process, the costs, obstacles, and strategies for success.

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Wayne Cobb: Cobb Counsel
  • Richard Vanderslice: Richard L. Vanderslice, PC
  • Kendall Pelling: East Liberty Development, Inc.

Presentation

PUBLIC SECTOR PARTNERSHIPS: Formalizing Current Operations: Community Partnerships with the City of Pittsburgh

ROOM – Monongahela

This session will give an overview of the Neighborhood Initiatives program the City of Pittsburgh is creating to improve cooperation between the various agencies and departments of the City and community organizations representing a geographic area or field of interest. The program intends to improve the flow of information between these groups and the City, enabling such organizations to participate in civic affairs, and enhancing the livability and character of the City and its neighborhoods. The Neighborhood Initiatives program is being developed through two main projects: the development of Registered Community Organizations (RCO’s) to formalize the role of community groups by increasing the opportunities for them to input their voice in decision-making related to development and neighborhood planning, and the development a Neighborhood Planning Manual which would allow for communities to have their plans accepted and adopted by the City for the first time.

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Stephanie Joy Everett: City of Pittsburgh Department of City Planning
  • Henry Pyatt: City of Pittsburgh, Office of the Mayor

Presentation

ADVANCING EQUITABLE DEVELOPMENT: We're Tired of Planning! SPARCCing Inclusive Change, Attracting National Capacity

ROOM – Sky

Even when robust community planning is inclusive and equitable, development projects that benefit some and adversely impact others persist. Historic discrimination, explicit and implicit, has led to the inequitable distribution of resources and power over many generations. Many of the policies and practices that influence community development reinforce these conditions, resulting in significant inequity across a range of interlocking factors including health, climate resilience, and housing. In communities across the country some leaders have had enough are harnessing local resources, community talent and new ideas to attract significant national support and kick inclusive visions into high implementation gear. In this session you’ll hear how initiatives like the Strong Prosperous and Resilient Communities Challenge (SPARCC), an initiative that will invest $20 million in grants and deploy upwards of $70 million of capital, harness local talent to tackle the rising tide of inequality and help communities move into action.

Format: Panel Discussion

Presenters:

  • Ghian Foreman: Managing Partner, Washington Park Development Group
  • Deborah Scott: Executive Director, Georgia STAND-UP
  • Sasha Forbes: Project Manager of Urban Solutions, Natural Resources Defense Council
  • Ernie Hogan: Executive Director, Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group